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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
revolt. but megyn: violent protests outside of egypt right now. members of president mohammed morsi's islam brotherhood. just think about what has happened here. the folks gathered en masse to protest the old leader, hosni mubarak. the muslim brotherhood said let's go for it. they reversed themselves and they rimini one. now, the people are back on the streets, protesting the new democratic policies by the new guy, where he did this huge paragraph, said that he could ignore the supreme court, pushed to the constitution, highly questionable, and the people in egypt are wondering what happened. human rights activists inside the country are claiming that the muslim brotherhood is now paying thugs to sexually assault women and physically assault men who gather in the square. fox news is not able to confirm these reports. several activists on the ground say that situation is getting very ugly again. steve harrigan is live from cairo. reporter: megyn, these are some of the worst clashes that we have seen so far in the protest. in the past, it has been pleased battling the protesters. righ
harrigan. since mohamed morsi, the president there assumed near absolute powers through a constitutional move. he and the muslim brotherhood have been doing things that have a lot of people concerned in terms of ramming through a very controversial new constitution that the people have been very unhappy about. what's going on there. come back home now for a moment and take a look at the latest numbers we have got on the u.s. economy. the weekly unemployment numbers came in as they do every thursday. the labor department reported 370,000 americans filed for first-time unemployment claims. either way, either way, folks, your taxes will go up despite the haggling going on on capitol hill. you will be paying more to the u.s. government. stuart varney joins me now. so, stuart, that's the bottom line. this is what people i think across the country are starting to realize no matter what they negotiate, 2013 will be different for most of us. >> this is the untold tax story. everybody has been concentrating on tax the rich, yes or no. but the payroll tax holiday goes away january 1. neither polit
and people say mohammed morrissey is this not an 80 character and no one takes them seriously. holding the real range power is the army, the guy in charge of the going on. then, the rest of the chiefs of staff, but were still extensively wandering away versus democratic mullally and future from our friends in the brotherhood. you have to just love it. when your eternal as life gives you phuket site to one of the 21st and 22nd of november. you have this incredible story in "the new york times" about how barack obama has established this confidence, trust. mohamed morsi has been minded to engineer the pragmatism the pragmatism in the next day he assumes dictatorial powers by declaring the timing was delicious. the point is this is the way the muslim brotherhood operates and anyone who understands that the brotherhood is out, cleanup adjustment taking could've seen this coming a long, long time ago. the conundrum is this, this is the essence of the problem. if you want to have a democratic process in the middle east, one that represents most of the people, you have to have islamist partie
supporters of president mohammed morsi, the muslim brotherhood, camed -- claimed victory in the first round of voting on morsi's draft constitution. this took place over the weekend. greg palkot streaming live from key owe egypt. greg? >> reporter: hey, jon, yeah. folks are a little bit on edge off voting over the weekend on the draft constitution. the results were closer than expected. the yes votes were 57%. no, 43%. the turnout was lower than usual. according to the opposition the vote was marched by maured by widespread irregularitis. opposition attacking opposition headquarters here in cairo. all that is prompting again by government critics who called for more protests on tuesday, in front. presidential palace in tahrir square behind me and up to the u.s. embassy. this is up to the second and final round of voting in rural areas of egypt on saturday for the constitution which is favored by egyptian president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood party. critics say it is too islamist. defenders say it is necessary to preserve stability here in this country. analysts are saying they
on the constitution has become a referendum on egypt's islamic president, mohamed morsi. >> reporter: both sides of the egyptian political divide plan major marches and rallies this morning. government supporters are calling a yes vote on the referendum a vote for islam. the opposition is fragmented and far less organized and decided only a few days ago to vote no rather than boycott the ballot. the new constitution was drafted by the ruling islamist party and its hard-line political allies. the mainly secular opposition says the 63-page document does not represent all of egypt's 83 million people and tramples on the rights of minorities such as christians. a major problem is a lack of monitors. a significant number of judges have refused to supervisor the 13,000 polling stations so the voting will have to be held over two days first in major cities an then in the countryside. many egyptians are simply growing weary after two years of political turmoil. adding to their woes is the effect on the economy. the tourism industry has been hard-hit and the prospects of attracting f
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
waiting for president mohammed morsi to speak. this is after a night of violent clashes that killed six people and killed more than 670 injured. tanks, armored personnel carriers clearing the area, scattering clouds of 0 protesters fighting in the streets. the latest spiral of violence after morsi's sweeping power grab. supporters of the muslim brotherhood who back president morsi clashing with opponents saying he made himself a dictator. reza sayah in cairo, the president not spoken. when he does, what might he say? >> reporter: well, nobody really knows what he's going to say other than members of his inner circle, but certainly, there's a lot of pressure on president morsi to calm down this conflict that's been escalating over a few days, especially the last night. we've eagerly waiting for him to speak, but he hasn't spoken yet. we're not quite sure what the delay is. initially, word was that at 6:00 p.m. local time, three and a half hours ago, he was going to deliver his speech and then reports came that this was going to be a taped speech. taped the address. dlifed it to state med
. mohammed, give us a sense. this is a pretty big fish for somebody to be leaving,nd i imagine he has valuable information as well being somebody part of the military police. >> reporter: that's right, suzanne. he identifies himself as a major general, that he's the chief of military police in syria. we spoke earlier with rebel free syrian army spokespeople. they said this was the man he claimed to be. the free syrian army helped to shuttle him to safety. it was a very difficult journey getting him from inside syria into neighboring turkey. it took far longer than they thought it would, and they were willing to help. other military officials wanted to defect for a certain amount of time longer. yes, as you said, if this turns out to be true and this man is as high-ranking as he said he is, this is a big blow to the regime. there's more and more high level defections the last several months. the fact more and more are coming seems to suggest he's losing more of a grip of power in syria. this is he not what they want out there when you have the u.n. and arab league enjoy trying to negot
mohamed morsi. he decreed recently himself above oversight. he's behind the draft constitution which protesters believe will tip power the his favor. here's what some told reza sa h sayah. >> he doesn't want to listen to our demands. >> what's your message to him coming out here. >> that what he's doing is completely unfair. this is not what we asked for. it's completely dictatorship. >> egyptians will vote on the new constitution on december 15th. >>> nato foreign ministers approved turkey's request for pate yoz missiles to defend its borders. that meant to shore up defense against violence that spills over from syria's civil war. back in october errant shells hit a turkey town killing five civilians. >>> a man pushed on to the subway tracks into the path of an oncoming train, his terrifying final moments laid out in a newspaper for all to see. if the crime wasn't horrible enough, these images are sparking outrage this morning. >> yep. >> first talking while driving, now eating behind the wheel is against the law in one town. find out where when we come back. questions? anyone have
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)